Baptism

Derived from the Greek word, bapto or baptizo, baptism means to wash or immerse. The ritual of Baptism symbolizes the washing away of sins and cleansing the soul by immersing it in water. Baptism is an important Sacrament and being baptized is an important part of being initiated into the family of the Catholic Church. Water baptism is an act of obedience and represents forgiveness and unity with Christ and the Holy Trinity of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

Infant Baptism:

In the Catholic Church today, baptism is most commonly administered to infants. Since baptism removes both the guilt and the punishment due to Original Sin, delaying baptism until a child can understand the sacrament may put the child’s salvation in danger, should he die unbaptized.

Adult Baptism:

Adult converts to Catholicism also receive the sacrament, unless they have already received a Christian baptism. A person can only be baptized once as a Christian—if, say, he was baptized as a Lutheran, he cannot be rebaptized when he converts to Catholicism. While an adult can be baptized after proper instruction in the Faith, adult baptism normally occurs today as part of the Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults (RCIA) and is immediately followed by Confirmation and Communion.


Baptism Services take place on the second and fourth Sunday of the month at 2:00 p.m.